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Kiwifruit - Cocktail Kiwi

Actinidia arguta
Varieties to choose from
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FAQs

(Note: This plant is no longer produced by incredible edibles®.)
New in Autumn 2002 this species has been in cultivation in the USA since the early 1900's, but has escaped attention here for many years. It is a native of China, Korea, Siberia and Japan. Produced in orchards in a way similar to the common 'Hayward' kiwifruit, but only on a small scale as yet. The Cocktail Kiwifruit is set to take off in New Zealand gardens both on the vine and on the plate!

Landscape Value

Ideal over a pergola or as a stand alone specimen in any garden can be created by planting like a pillar-rose on an umbrella system.

Nutritional Value

High in Vitamin C and dietary fibre with good levels of Vitamin E and antioxidants.

How to Eat

Off the plant and in the mouth - no cutting no spoons! There are no hairs so the Cocktail Kiwi can be eaten skin and all like a grape. Can be used anywhere the traditional kiwifruit is used. Adds life to salads and desserts.

Generic Fruiting Time

J F M A M J J A S O N D

Growing

Sun

Will tolerate shade but prefers full sun.

Wind

Provide protection from wind.

Climate

Very cold hardy plant but fruits best in full sun conditions.

Soil

Well-drained fertile soil.

Planting

Provide a structure to grow on like a pergola, wires or an umbrella support. If you desire divide plant by cutting cleanly between the two plants with a spade or similar. Avoid disturbing the root system as much as possible. The ideal time to plant is when the plants are deciduous. Train central leader to top of frame. Then train leader along the top allowing up to 3 main leaders depending on the growing structure.

Fertiliser

Fertilise in spring with a balanced fertiliser.

Pruning

Summer Pruning: Cut back excess growth after the fruit has formed to prevent tangling. Winter Pruning:

Male Flower

Female Flower

... read more about pruning

Pests

Plants are relatively free from problems. One odd problem is the fact that the trunks have a catnip-like aroma which cats love to rub against. When plants are small, this can be a problem as they can rub off any new shoots which emerge in the spring. Garden snails can also be a problem on younger plantings. Scale insects can damage if populations build up too extensively.

Hardiness

Hardy to -5°C

Special Conditions

The spring growth is susceptible to frost damage so protect with frost cloth.

 


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